Voter Engagement and Participation: An Important Role for Advocates

As advocates working with and on behalf of survivors of domestic and sexual violence, we are often in a unique position to see the real impact that laws and policies have on people’s daily lives – on their safety, health, economic security, and well-being. We can notice patterns and gaps in how systems are or are not responding, and by deeply listening to survivors and communities, we can help identify policy solutions that can make a significant positive difference.•

At NRCDV, we’re taking time this Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM) to share the importance of voting and civic engagement and to highlight the connections between how we vote and the policies that impact survivors’ lives.

DVAM 2018: What's Your #1Thing?

Social justice movements thrive when each person does their part in advancing the cause. For some, this might mean canvassing in your community before a local election or volunteering for a local crisis line. It could also be educating your loved ones about microaggressions, showing up regularly to rallies for racial justice, or sharing your story of resilience as a survivor.

“Doing your part” to end domestic violence looks different for each and every one of us, but the key is that we act. When we go beyond raising awareness to taking action by showing up, stepping in, and speaking out, real social change is possible. That’s why, for Domestic Violence Awareness Month(DVAM) this October, we’re challenging you to find the “one thing” you can do to promote social change, and then take ACTION!

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Awareness + Action = Social Change: Why racial justice matters in the prevention equation

Awareness + Action = Social Change

“Primary prevention is changing the social norms that allow and condone violence. Preventing violence means changing our society and its institutions—targeting attitudes, beliefs, behaviors, environments and policies to eliminate those that contribute to violence and to promote those that stop the violence. Primary prevention of domestic and sexual violence is defined as preventing violence before it occurs. This is social change work (MCADSV, 2012).”